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Solar Panels represent the most reliable, predictable, low cost and low maintenance source of renewable energy for Stand Alone Power Systems.

Solar modules are typically mounted on your roof or ground mounted frames to convert sunlight into electricity (DC).

An inverter then converts the DC electricity into common 240V alternating current (AC) electricity. This can then be used to either power your household appliances directly, or charge storage batteries for use at night.

We offer a range of solar technologies from leading manufacturers, ensuring the right technology is utilised for your situation.

Monocrystalline

Monocrystalline solar panels are a proven technology that have been widely in use for over 50 years. Monocrystalline panels have a higher conversion efficiency which makes them ideal for areas where space is limited. Monocrystalline requires very high grade silicon which is costly to make and consumes a large amount of energy to produce.

Advantages:

  • High annual yields even with sub-optimal levels of sunlight.
  • Excels in performance even in weak light conditions.
  • Boosted cold weather performance for when you need it most.
  • Requires less roof space for a given power output.
  • Slow degradation, generally losing only 0.25 – 0.5% per year.

Disadvantages:

  • Monocrystalline modules suffer greater output reduction than Thin Film on hotter days, however there is often surplus power on hot days so this may not matter.

Polycrystalline

Polycrystalline panels are widely installed throughout the world and tend to outperform monocrystalline modules in hotter climates and in lower light conditions. They are usually slightly less space efficiency though, and take up marginally more area as a result. Polycrystalline panels have a simpler manufacturing process than monocrystalline.

Advantages:

  • High annual yields even with sub-optimal levels of sunlight.
  • Excels in performance even in weak light conditions.
  • Better high temperature tolerance than monocrystalline panels.
  • Simpler manufacturing process.
  • Slow degradation, generally losing only 0.25 – 0.5% per year.

Disadvantages:

  • Slightly less space efficient than some monocrystalline modules.

Thin Film Hybrid

Thin Film has great low light and shade performance qualities as well as high temperature tolerance. Thin Film is less space efficient and requires more physical area, but importantly it will yield more energy per Watt (kWh/kW) than any other solar panel. Hybrid technology combines thin film amorphous with multicrystalline in order to improve space efficiency while maintaining thin film’s other attractive qualities.

Advantages:

  • Yields more energy than most other technologies (kWh).
  • Increased low light performance.
  • Increased shade tolerance.
  • Excellent high temperature tolerance and performance.
  • Slow lifetime degradation – generally losing only 0.25 – 0.5% per year.
  • Less embodied energy – a shorter energy payback period.

Disadvantages:

  • Not as space efficient – requires more physical area.
  • Costs more to install because of larger installation area.